Beginners Obedience
THE GOAL - Teach dogs and handlers the basic commands and skills of obedience.  All work will be done on a lead.

THINGS YOU WILL LEARN -
  • Proper use of a collar and lead
  • Walking on a loose lead
  • Heel and proper heel position including pace changes, turns (left, right, about), circle right and left, and automatic sit
  • "Come" including "come-fore", formal recall, and restrained recall
  • Sit command
  • Proper praise and correction techniques and importance of timing
  • Proper use of release word, tone of voice, enthusiasm in training
  • Crate training, basic manners, and household obedience/management
Advanced Beginners
THE GOAL - To have dogs be able to perform a basic sub-novice routine.

THINGS YOU WILL LEARN -
  • Assisting dogs to become "solid" on commands learned in beginners class through practice and review
  • Stand for examination
  • Figure 8 exercise
  • Finishes
  • Variations in heeling and recalls
  • Canine Good Citizen exercises
  • Introductory use of long line and flex-lead for training purposes
  • Judge dog and handler in a formal sub-novice routine
Beginning Novice
THE GOAL  - To provide the basic knowledge and control needed to perform a novice routine.

THINGS YOU WILL LEARN -
  • Proper footwork for heeling (turns and halts)
  • Introduce off-lead work with emphasis on control
  • Pivots
  • Proof on-lead work including heeling, fronts, finishes, stays, and stand for exam
  • Reinforce handler and dog enthusiasm and attention
  • Introduce random sits and downs and the "take it" command
Advanced Novice
THE GOAL - To have dogs and handlers ready to compete in novice

THINGS YOU WILL LEARN -
  • Proof and polish all on lead work
  • Proof and polish of lead work to the extent dog is ready
  • Continue to improve handler's footwork and pivots
  • Continue to teach AKC regulations including completion of entry form
  • Continue progress on random drops, out of sight stays and take it command
  • Review ring procedures, appropriate dress, what to take to a trial, etc.
  • Introduce proper jumping techniques
  • Individual problem solving as needed
  • Judge dog and handler on formal novice routine
Beginning Open

THE GOAL - to introduce and begin proficiency on all open exercises including:

(the completion of the retrieve specialty class is highly recommended before taking this class)


  • Proof "take it", "hold", and "give" commands
  • Improve off lead heeling and figure 8
  • Proof formal retrieve on the flat exercise
  • Continue jump work including solid, bar, and broad jump slowly increasing to full height
  • Drop on recall
  • Full length out of sight stays

Advanced Open

THE GOAL - to have dogs and handlers ready to compete in open including:


  • Proof all heeling
  • Teach and proof retrieve of high jump exercise
  • Proof broad jump
  • Proof out of sight stays
  • AKC open regulations and ring procedures
  • Introduce go-outs
  • Introduce hand signals
Beginning Utility

THE GOAL - to teach utility exercises and get handlers and dogs ready to compete in utility including:

(out of necessity, these classes are taught more as problem solving, work at your own pace classes)


  • Signal exercise
  • Scent retrieval
  • Moving stand for examination
  • Directed retrieve
  • Go outs
  • Directed jumping
  • AKC regulations and ring procedures
Advanced Utility

THE GOAL - to teach utility exercises and get handlers and dogs ready to compete in utility including:


(out of necessity, these classes are taught more as problem solving, work at your own pace classes)


  • Signal exercise
  • Scent retrieval
  • Moving stand for examination
  • Directed retrieve
  • Go outs
  • Directed jumping
  • AKC regulations and ring procedures


We have over 75 Instructors at CATC, some with over 40 years of experience in dog training!!

What is AKC Obedience?

​​​​​​​​​​New Classes Starting: Beginner Classes on Jan 2, 2018
Puppy Classes on Jan 15, 2018

Demonstrating the usefulness of a dog as a companion to humankind, AKC Obedience is a sport with rules, regulations, judges, conditioning, training, placements and prizes.

Dog and handler teams are judged on how closely they match the judge’s mental picture of a theoretically perfect performance as they execute a series of specified exercises.
Accuracy and precision are essential, but the natural movement of the handler and the willingness and enjoyment of the dog are very important.


Helen Whitehouse Walker devised the first obedience “test” in Mt. Kisco, New York in 1933 to show the intelligence of her poodles.


The first AKC licensed obedience trial was held in 1936 with approximately 200 entries in 18 trials.


Each level of obedience competition – novice, open, and utility – requires mastering a specific skill set, which increase in difficulty, before advancing to the next level.


  • The Novice Class demonstrates good canine companion skills such as heeling, both with and without a leash, coming when called, standing for a simple physical examination, and staying in both a sit and a down position with a group of dogs. In the Novice Class, dogs earn an AKC Companion Dog (CD) title after receiving three qualifying scores under two different judges.
  • The Open Class is more challenging as more exercises are done off leash and retrieving and jumping challenges are added. In the Open Class, dogs earn an AKC Companion Dog Excellent (CDX) title after receiving three qualifying scores under two different judges.

  • The Utility Class, which includes scent discrimination, directed retrieves, jumping and silent signal exercises, is the most challenging class. In the Utility Class, dogs earn an AKC Utility Dog (UD) title after receiving three qualifying scores from two different judges.


Upon completion of the UD title, dogs may earn the Utility Dog Excellent (UDX) by receiving 10 passing scores in both Open B and Utility B at the same show.


In October of 2004, numeric designations were added to the UDX.  The highest UDX title to date is a UDX71, OTCH Jo’s Xpensif Hobi O’Redfield UDX71 MX MXJ.  The Obedience Trial Championship (OTCH) title is often referred to as the “PhD” for dogs, is the highest obedience honor a dog can receive. To obtain an OTCH title, a dog and handler team must receive 100 points by placing first, second, third or fourth in the Open B or Utility B classes and a first place in Utility B and/or Open B three times. To compete in the AKC National Obedience Invitational dogs must be the top OTCH and OTCH-pointed dogs in each breed. The AKC National Obedience Championship title (NOC) is awarded to one dog each year. Only dogs winning the AKC National Obedience Championship are permitted to have the prestigious NOC letters precede its name in AKC records.There are 14 NOCs in the seventeen-year history of this event 3 dogs having won the award twice.

Did you know that as of April 2010, mixed breed dogs can be shown in AKC performance events!!!!!

WE CAN SHOW YOU HOW!

Columbus All-Breed Training Club

"We teach you to train your dog"